Blog posts for August 2019

 

How to stop your puppy 'jumping up'

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Jumping up

While we all love coming home to an affectionate puppy or dog, it’s important to avoid inadvertently encouraging ‘jumping up’ behaviour.  Your cute (and small-ish) puppy will grow, and you might not want to see this behaviour when they reach adulthood.

Jumping up

While we all love coming home to an affectionate puppy or dog, it’s important to avoid inadvertently encouraging ‘jumping up’ behaviour.  Your cute (and small-ish) puppy will grow, and you might not want to see this behaviour when they reach adulthood.

Be consistent 

Now is the time to be consistent in the way you respond to your puppy’s behaviour.  If you praise and give attention to your puppy when they jump up, they’re being reinforced to offering you this behaviour.  They will not understand why you are reacting differently when they become a bigger dog.

How do I train my puppy not to 'jump up'?

Reward your puppy for an alternative behaviour such as sitting or having all four paws on the floor.  If your puppy jumps on you, immediately turn away.  Do not look at or speak to your dog.  When they get down and have all paws on the ground, immediately praise and reward. 

Consistently practice this over and over so that your puppy learns the connection between having all paws on the ground and a reward.  Ensure this is consistently applied by all family, friends and visitors. Set your puppy up for success!  Anticipate jumping up and instead ask for the alternative behaviour.  Your puppy will learn that they don’t need to jump up.  Instead, if they are calm and sit, they will get your attention.

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Ways to pamper your dog on their birthday

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This is an image of a pet celebrating their birthday.

Many happy returns

If your pooch has a birthday or anniversary coming up, we know you’re going to want to celebrate!  Our dogs are special family members, so here’s some fun ways you can make their day memorable. 

Many happy returns

If your pooch has a birthday or anniversary coming up, we know you’re going to want to celebrate!  Our dogs are special family members, so here’s some fun ways you can make their day memorable. 

Gift time

Did you know that 62% of Australian dog parents buy their dog a birthday present?  Does your dog need a snazzy new collar or lead, or perhaps their bed could do with an update?  Also consider a new chew toy or a puzzle feeder as these are great for providing mental stimulation to help keep your pet occupied when you’re not home.  For a bit of fun you could also take your dog along to a local dog-friendly pet supplies store, let them wander the aisles and select their own gift!

Plan a fun doggy day out

Today’s the day for an extra special outing!  You might like to start at a pet-friendly café before heading out on a walk somewhere you both haven’t been before.  Find a new walking trail or dog park so that your dog can explore the varied sights and allow plenty of time for all those exciting and unfamiliar smells!

Book a pamper appointment

Perhaps your pooch could do with some spa treatment and a bit of a makeover?  Book them a pamper session at a local groomer for a bath, groom and nail trim to get them looking and feeling great.  Then take them out to a pet-friendly venue to show off their new look!

Doggy birthday party 

Does your dog have a few good doggy pals?  Or maybe you’d prefer to invite some family and friends with sociable dogs over to your place, or meet at a local park.  You can play some fun dog inspired party games and serve dog-friendly cake.  Play a version of the classic Musical Chairs game by having all dogs on a leash.  Ask their dog parents to walk them around while the music is playing and when the music stops shout ‘sit’.  The last pooch to bring tail to ground is out!  Have a prize for the winner.

When partying outside make sure there’s shade and water and that all dogs are well supervised.  You can even prepare doggie bags filled with pet treats to hand out when the party’s over.  Remember to take lots of photos of your pet’s special day!

Make a dog-friendly ‘birthday cake’

Create a dog-friendly ‘birthday cake’ using a few tasty wet dog food trays layered up.  Choose flavours that your pup loves, and you can also sprinkle some dry food kibble between the layers and decorate with pet treats on the top.  Don’t forget to sing happy birthday!

Whichever way you choose to celebrate your best friend’s special day, the main thing is that your pup gets to spend extra time with you.  That will be the best present in the world!

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Biting and scratching in kittens

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This is an image of two kittens playing.

Natural born hunter

Kittens begin to develop play behaviour at an early age, and this includes mastering the use of their sharp teeth and claws!  Here we take a look at the basis for these play behaviours, and what you can do if your kitten’s play is a little overzealous!

Natural born hunter

Kittens begin to develop play behaviour at an early age, and this includes mastering the use of their sharp teeth and claws! 

Young kittens love to stalk, chase and pounce.  They also wrestle, bite and scratch their littermates and mother - all in the name of fun.  This behaviour is helping the kitten learn the hunting behaviours that used to be essential for survival.  Luckily, your kitten can now depend on you for their next meal, but their instincts run deep!  In fact, your kitten's instinct to hunt is so strong that they'll do it even when they aren’t hungry. 

Bite inhibition

Kittens learn to inhibit any overly aggressive behaviour while they are still with their littermates and mother.  If play is too rough, a sibling or mum will let the offending kitten know by way of a growl or a well-placed swipe, and play might stop.  Through this process, kittens learn to control aggressive behaviour.

Proper socialisation

Socialisation helps a kitten learn how to interact appropriately with humans and other animals.  Kittens who are poorly socialised or handled roughly by people may develop behaviours that are aggressive and don’t learn to control their biting intensity.

Help!  My kitten is biting and scratching me

While your kitten is young, all those little bites and scratches are really just playfulness.  But if you find your kitten is coming on a bit too strong, try interrupting the game and ignoring them for a while. 

If your kitten bites you, make a short sharp yelping sound.  At the same time withdraw your attention from your kitten and ignore it.  This shows your kitten that when they bite, the fun and play stops.  When your kitten is calm, gently praise and reward them. 

Make sure that you are consistent in how you interact with your kitten.  Don't allow your kitten to play roughly with you so that you aren't encouraging biting and scratching behaviour.  

Be mindful of the signals you (and others) send if you do play wrestle with your kitten.  Don't let them nip or scratch you just because they're cute and small.  They will grow and get bigger and stronger!  It’s a good idea to encourage your kitten to wrestle with a toy, rather than you. 

Thankfully, most kittens grow out of the aggressive stage and develop into lovely natured cats, more interested to smooch than to bite you.

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