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ADVANCE™ is scientifically formulated to help improve pet health.  Read all the latest articles and news, as well as get tips and advice on puppy, kitten, dog and cat nutrition and health care topics.  Brought to you by the experts at ADVANCE™ premium pet food.

Blog posts tagged with ‘kitten’

We found 25 results tagged with 'kitten'.

Scratching behaviour in cats

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Scratching

Scratching is a normal feline behaviour that serves a range of important functions for a cat.  However, in the interest of a happy co-existence with your kitty, it’s important that this behaviour is directed onto appropriate surfaces.  Training is best started early on in kittenhood.  Read on for tips to help save your furniture.

Why do cats scratch?

Scratching is a normal feline behaviour. 

It’s used to groom nails, for marking territory (both visual as well as scent signals) and to help cats stretch and condition their muscles.  Most cats have 5 claws on each front leg and 4 claws on each hind leg, for a grand total of 18 claws.

Given that scratching serves a range of functions for a cat, it’s not a behaviour that can be stopped.  It is however a behaviour that needs to be directed onto appropriate surfaces.  Your kitten needs you to help them understand what is okay to scratch and what isn’t.  The effort you put in will be a life saver for your furniture and other valuables.

What do cats like to scratch?

In general, cats are attracted to textured surfaces and items they can sink their claws into.  However, different cats prefer different scratching surfaces, so initially you might like to offer a range of surfaces and see what your kitty is fond of.  Common materials to try are sisal rope, cardboard, carpet, rough fabrics and wood. 

Cats will often have a scratch after they wake from a nap and when they want to mark their territory.  They also like to scratch when they’re excited about something.

How do I prevent my cat scratching the furniture?

Ideally begin training to use the scratching post while your cat is young.  Supply both vertical and horizontal surfaces covered with your cat’s preferred material.  Make the scratching surfaces desirable by placing catnip or treats on them and train your cat by encouraging them with a toy held part way up, and reward the cat for using it.

If the cat prefers another material, such as the couch, attempt to get an appropriate item covered in a similar material.

Never punish your kitten or cat if you see them scratching an item they shouldn’t, as this will only teach them that scratching the item while you are around is scary.  Your cat will likely continue to scratch it when you are gone.

A better method is to cover the inappropriate item in double sided sticky tape or another material such as plastic which makes the item aversive at all times.  Meanwhile, positively reinforce the cat with praise and treats when they scratch the appropriate item.

Nail care can also help reduce inappropriate scratching.  Pair nail trims with positive reinforcement eg treats to create a positive association for your cat.

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Socialising your kitten

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This is an image of two kittens playing.

Positive socialisation practices are critical for your kitten                                                              

What your kitten experiences in their first few months will influence the rest of their life.  In fact, their early experiences shape their future character.  Cats that are under socialised may become shy and fearful.  In contrast, kittens that have been well socialised generally grow into happy, confident adults.   

Positive socialisation practices are critical for your kitten                                                              

What your kitten experiences in their first few months will influence the rest of their life.  In fact, their early experiences shape their future character.  Cats that have been well socialised generally grow into happy, confident adults.  

Socialising your kitten involves introducing them to a whole range of new experiences including meeting different types of people, other animals, places, smells and noises. 

Positive socialisation

Be sure to present socialisation experiences in a gentle way that helps your kitten become accustomed to them.  Reward your kitten for calm behaviour and move only at a pace your kitten can handle.  If your kitten seems nervous or fearful, that's your cue to slow things down.  The aim is for new experiences to be presented in a positive way so that your kitten can develop into a relaxed, confident cat.  

Remember that it's still important that socialisation continues throughout your cat's life. 

Here are some typical situations in which kittens should be socialised:

Environment

  • Drive in the car
  • Trips to the vet.  Have your kitten weighed, handled and restrained for a health check
  • Using a cat carrier
  • At home, exposure to different floor surfaces, steps, tools, cleaning, working, music, pram
  • Outside (while on a harness) exposure to bicycles, gardening

Other animals

  • Other cats and kittens (all well-socialised and fully vaccinated)
  • Dogs (only cat-friendly ones)
  • Farm animals
  • Birds (in a manner where the bird is safely able to get away)
  • Any other animal they may come in contact with during their lifetime

Situations

  • Visitors in the home,
  • Being groomed
  • Having a picture taken
  • Being held (in a manner where they are never afraid and never dropped)
  • Tooth brushing
  • Nails clipped
  • Playing with a variety of toys

People

  • Children
  • People wearing glasses, hats
  • People with beards
  • Loud and timid people 

By providing your kitten with a wide range of positive socialisation experiences, you'll help them develop into a sociable and well-adjusted cat.

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Common kitten feeding queries

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This is an image of a group of kittens.

Feeding your kitten

It can be argued that nothing plays a more important role in healthy kitten growth and development as nutrition, so let's look at some common kitten feeding queries.  

Feeding your kitten

It can be argued that nothing plays a more important role in healthy kitten growth and development as nutrition, so let's look at some common kitten feeding queries.  

How much to feed my kitten?

Use the feeding guide found on pet food packaging as a starting point.  This will show you the total daily amount to offer your kitten.  Keen an eye on your kitten's body condition so that you can fine tune the amount fed, if needed.  Have a chat to your veterinarian if you're concerned about your kitten's body condition or growth rate.  

How often to feed my kitten?

In general, younger kittens should be fed smaller meals more frequently.  This is to help allow them take in enough food for growth.  Their stomach capacity is small, therefore they require frequent meals.  

Over time, the number of meals can be gradually reduced so that by the time your kitten reaches adulthood, they will be on one or two meals per day.  Many cats prefer to graze feed throughout the day, and this is acceptable provided they maintain a healthy body condition and are not allowed to become overweight.

Ensure that your kitten has free access to a continual supply of fresh drinking water in a suitable sized container.

Should I feed my kitten a home-made diet?

It can be tempting to feed a pet a diet made up of human food and table scraps.  However, it is a challenge to create a home-made diet that is complete and balanced, especially in the long term.  Kittens need a complete and balanced diet that is specially formulated to support their healthy growth and development.  A high quality super premium pet food such as ADVANCE™ provides this peace of mind.

In addition, some human foods can be toxic to pets such as grapes, raisins, onions and chocolate. 

Should I feed my kitten dry or wet food?

Dry and wet foods are equally nutritious.  The feeding of both dry and wet foods is known as ‘mixed feeding’.  This method of feeding provides a pet with taste and texture variety and enables them to get the benefits that each feeding format offers.

ADVANCE™ kitten diets are suitable for all breeds, so you can be sure there's a diet that’s just right for your kitten.

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Bringing your kitten home

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This is an image of two kittens playing.

Settling in

Lots of kittens can seem timid when they first move to a new home.  It's understandable, as leaving the only family they've ever known to start another life with a new family is a pretty big deal!  Here we offer our tips for helping your new arrival feel at home in no time.

Settling in

Lots of kittens can seem timid when they first move to a new home.  

It's understandable, as leaving the only family they've ever known to start another life with a new family is a pretty big deal!  Here are our tips for helping your new arrival feel at home in no time.

Take it slow

Don't be in a rush to remove the cat carrier your kitten was transported in.  Instead, leave it in the corner of the room where your kitten will sleep to create a familiar refuge.  Initially, a new kitten might hide quite a bit until they become more accustomed to their new home.  Don’t worry, it won’t be long before they will be out and about exploring their new surroundings.

Essential items

Provide your kitten with a litter tray on one side of the room and a fresh bowl of food and water on the other.  You might like to also supply a few other hiding places such as a cardboard box (a perennial kitten favourite!) to help your kitten feel safe and secure. 

Leave your kitten's food and water bowls, as well as litter tray in the same spot so they can be located easily.

Keep things quiet

In order for your kitten to adapt to a new environment and settle into a regular feeding and sleeping routine, the household should be kept relatively quiet and visitors kept to a minimum for the first two weeks.  Children should be reminded that the new kitten needs lots of rest and should not be over-handled. 

Wait before making introductions

If you have other pets at home, it’s best not to introduce them just yet.  Provide your kitten with their own space for the first few days or weeks.  This will help boost your kitten's confidence levels.

Exploring the home

Once your kitten has settled in, and developed a regular routine of eating, drinking and using the litter tray, they will become curious about their new home and be keen to start to explore.  Ensure this is well supervised, and limit your kitten to the areas of your home where you spend the most time.  This provides the opportunity to reinforce desirable behaviour.                 

Finally, remember not to let your kitten outside until they are fully vaccinated.  If they arrived fully vaccinated, it's still best to keep your kitten indoors for the first 2 to 3 weeks.

Other pets in the home can then be introduced very slowly and only under close supervision.

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Should I feed wet or dry food?

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This is an image of a dog and cat together.

Wet and dry food

There's an ever increasing range of pet food products available, often in a variety of formats.  Many pet parents wonder if they should be feeding dry food, wet food or a combination.  Each feeding format has specific advantages so let’s take a look at some of them.

Wet and dry food

There's an ever increasing range of pet food products available, often in a variety of formats.  Many pet parents wonder if they should be feeding dry food, wet food or a combination. 

Each feeding format offers specific advantages so let’s take a look at some of them.

Wet food

• Comes in a variety of packaging types such as tray, pouch and can

• Provides variety to a pet’s diet through flavour and texture

• Food is sterilised through cooking, so no preservatives are added

• Easy to chew texture can help puppies and kittens, as well as senior pets

• Provides additional moisture, especially beneficial to the pet when the weather is warm

• Aromas and texture can help tempt fussy eaters

• High moisture content helps maintain lower urinary tract health

• Less calorie dense than dry food, so can assist with weight loss and healthy weight management

Dry food:

• Concentrated nutrition, so you feed less

• Economical

• Convenient to use and store

• Crunchy kibbles may help improve dental health and freshen breath

• May contain active ingredients such as stabilised Green Lipped Mussel powder for joint health

Should I feed wet or dry food?

Wet and dry foods are equally nutritious.  The important thing is that you offer your pet a diet that is complete and balanced for their life-stage.

The feeding of both wet and dry food formats together is known as ‘mixed feeding’.  This method of feeding provides a pet with taste and texture variety and enables them to get the benefits that each feeding format offers.  In other words, mixed feeding provides a pet with the best of both worlds, so it's a great choice. 

When feeding both ADVANCE™ wet and dry food, simply halve the recommended quantities of each product and let your pet enjoy the advantages of both formats.

What about home prepared and raw feeding?

Some pet parents want to feed the wild nature of their cats and dogs, but it’s important to remember that our couch-dwelling pets have evolved quite a bit from their days as wolves and free-roaming cats. 

Cats and dogs require about 40 essential nutrients, each in the right form and in the right amount (balanced) to deliver complete nutrition.  Formulating a pet’s diet means ensuring that the minimum and maximum amounts of vitamins and minerals are met – and that adds an extra element of risk to home-prepared or raw meals.

While raw meat can be a novelty for your pet, it has to be very fresh.  A recent study, published in Vet Record, has found that raw meat can contain high levels of bacteria that may pose health risks for your pet.  The researchers also explain that such food could present a health risk to you, or others in your household if their immune system is compromised (children, the elderly or anyone using immune system suppressant medication for a health condition).

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