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ADVANCE™ is scientifically formulated to help improve pet health.  Read all the latest articles and news, as well as get tips and advice on puppy, kitten, dog and cat nutrition and health care topics.  Brought to you by the experts at ADVANCE™ premium pet food.

Blog posts tagged with ‘puppy’

We found 27 results tagged with 'puppy'.

Should I feed wet or dry food?

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This is an image of a dog and cat together.

Wet and dry food

There's an ever increasing range of pet food products available, often in a variety of formats.  Many pet parents wonder if they should be feeding dry food, wet food or a combination.  Each feeding format has specific advantages so let’s take a look at some of them.

Wet and dry food

There's an ever increasing range of pet food products available, often in a variety of formats.  Many pet parents wonder if they should be feeding dry food, wet food or a combination. 

Each feeding format offers specific advantages so let’s take a look at some of them.

Wet food

• Comes in a variety of packaging types such as tray, pouch and can

• Provides variety to a pet’s diet through flavour and texture

• Food is sterilised through cooking, so no preservatives are added

• Easy to chew texture can help puppies and kittens, as well as senior pets

• Provides additional moisture, especially beneficial to the pet when the weather is warm

• Aromas and texture can help tempt fussy eaters

• High moisture content helps maintain lower urinary tract health

• Less calorie dense than dry food, so can assist with weight loss and healthy weight management

Dry food:

• Concentrated nutrition, so you feed less

• Economical

• Convenient to use and store

• Crunchy kibbles may help improve dental health and freshen breath

• May contain active ingredients such as stabilised Green Lipped Mussel powder for joint health

Should I feed wet or dry food?

Wet and dry foods are equally nutritious.  The important thing is that you offer your pet a diet that is complete and balanced for their life-stage.

The feeding of both wet and dry food formats together is known as ‘mixed feeding’.  This method of feeding provides a pet with taste and texture variety and enables them to get the benefits that each feeding format offers.  In other words, mixed feeding provides a pet with the best of both worlds, so it's a great choice. 

When feeding both ADVANCE™ wet and dry food, simply halve the recommended quantities of each product and let your pet enjoy the advantages of both formats.

What about home prepared and raw feeding?

Some pet parents want to feed the wild nature of their cats and dogs, but it’s important to remember that our couch-dwelling pets have evolved quite a bit from their days as wolves and free-roaming cats. 

Cats and dogs require about 40 essential nutrients, each in the right form and in the right amount (balanced) to deliver complete nutrition.  Formulating a pet’s diet means ensuring that the minimum and maximum amounts of vitamins and minerals are met – and that adds an extra element of risk to home-prepared or raw meals.

While raw meat can be a novelty for your pet, it has to be very fresh.  A recent study, published in Vet Record, has found that raw meat can contain high levels of bacteria that may pose health risks for your pet.  The researchers also explain that such food could present a health risk to you, or others in your household if their immune system is compromised (children, the elderly or anyone using immune system suppressant medication for a health condition).

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Puppies and chewing behaviour

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This is an image of a puppy with a stick in their mouth

Nom nom nom

Given that puppies learn through mouthing behaviours, it's normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects.  Many pet parents find that chewing behaviours start to increase in intensity when their puppy is around 4 to 6 months of age due to teething.  Chewing helps a dog achieve a number of things, so let's take a look at how you can help manage chewing behaviours in your puppy.

Nom nom nom

Given that puppies learn through mouthing behaviours, it's normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects.  Many pet parents find that chewing behaviours start to increase in intensity when their puppy is around 4 to 6 months of age due to teething.  

Chewing helps a dog achieve a number of things.  For puppies, it’s a way to help relieve teething pain when the gums are sore and new teeth are erupting.  For older dogs, chewing helps exercise the jaws to keep them strong, as well as promoting dental health by helping keep teeth clean. 

Chewing also plays an important role in alleviating boredom and can help a puppy self-soothe which relieves mild anxiety or frustration. 

Tensions can arise over what is being chewed - a chew toy is fine, your new shoes are not!

How can I stop my puppy from chewing everything?

Given the benefits that chewing provides to puppies, we don't want to inhibit the behaviour but we do need to teach a puppy what is okay to chew and what is not. 

By offering a range of chew toys, and rotating them regularly to maintain their novelty factor and prevent boredom, you can show your puppy what is acceptable to chew.  Provide a range of different toys with varying shapes, textures and flavours. 

As part of puppy proofing your home, be sure to remove any items you value out of your puppy’s reach to prevent them being chewed.  This also helps ensure your puppy's safety (think chewed electrical wires). 

Ensure that the chew toys you offer your puppy are safe.  Inspect them regularly for signs of wear and replace any damaged toys.

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Walking on the leash

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Did someone say 'walkies'?

Getting out and about on walking adventures is one of the best parts of life with a dog, but all puppies need time to get used to walking on the leash.  Follow our tips and you'll be strutting your stuff in no time!

Did someone say 'walkies'?

Getting out and about on walking adventures is one of the best parts of life with a dog, but all puppies need time to get used to walking on the leash. 

Follow our tips and you'll be strutting your stuff in no time!

How do I get my puppy used to walking on a leash?

Practice attaching a light leash to your puppy’s collar and encourage them to walk around the room.  Initially, allow your puppy to drag the leash along the floor.  Next, pick up the end of the leash and encourage your puppy to come toward you.

As your puppy moves forward, praise and reward them.  If your puppy sits and refuses to move, change direction and call your puppy towards you with an enthusiastic tone of voice.  When your puppy comes, praise and reward them. 

Keep practice sessions short and fun, so that your puppy enjoys them and views the leash in a positive way. 

How do I stop my puppy from pulling on the leash?

Your puppy should learn that pulling on the leash results in stopping, rather than going forward. 

Attach a leash to your puppy's collar and then encourage your puppy to stand near your side.  Attract your puppy’s attention by saying their name and then start walking forward.  When your puppy is walking by your side without pulling, praise and reward them. 

If your puppy pulls on the leash, stop so that your puppy cannot continue forward.  You can then encourage your puppy back to your side and begin moving forward again.  It can help to lure your puppy into position with a treat or a toy. 

Special harnesses and halters are available which can help prevent large or strong puppies from pulling on the leash.  These may be useful but should not be used as a substitute for training a puppy to walk without pulling.

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Ouch! Puppy mouthing and biting behaviour

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This is an image of a puppy with a toy.

Sharp puppy teeth

Spend a few minutes with a young puppy and you’ll soon become aware of just how sharp those puppy teeth are.  Puppy play can quickly turn rough, but it’s important to remember that your puppy isn’t trying to hurt you.  Puppies are learning about the world, and they use their mouths to explore.  You need to help your puppy learn appropriate behaviour, so that play time is a fun and bonding experience for you both.  Let’s take a look at what you can do.

Sharp puppy teeth

Spend a few minutes with a young puppy and you’ll soon become aware of just how sharp those puppy teeth are.  Puppy play can quickly turn rough, but it’s important to remember that your puppy isn’t trying to hurt you.  Puppies are learning about the world, and they use their mouths to explore.  You need to help your puppy learn appropriate behaviour, so that play time is a fun and bonding experience for you both.  Let’s take a look at what you can do.

Play fighting

Puppies aren't able to use their hands, so they use their mouths instead.  It's normal for puppies to bare their teeth, growl, nip and bite their litter mates.  In fact, play fighting begins to develop in puppies from 2 to 3 weeks of age.  Puppies also mouth on things around them which often includes their mum.  It's often mum who is the first one to let a puppy know if a bite is too hard, or play is too rough as she starts to teach her litter 'bite inhibition'.  A puppy's litter mates also help with this too.

Learning bite inhibition

It's important to teach puppies to inhibit their biting when interacting with humans and other pets.  What might seem cute while your puppy is young can become a serious problem as your puppy grows.  You don't want your puppy biting hard or biting children.  Bite inhibition is something that every puppy needs to learn, and they'll need your help.  That way they learn how to control themselves so they can develop into a well behaved, balanced adult dog.

What should I do if my puppy is mouthing and nipping?

Think about how you play with your puppy, and encourage gentle play right from the start.  Remember that your little puppy will grow, and you want them to be well mannered around people of all ages.

A range of safe and appropriately sized chew toys are a must for every puppy.  When play becomes more vigorous, redirect your puppy by placing a chew toy in their mouth.  Your puppy then learns that this is an appropriate item to mouth on.  In the early stages, you'll need to redirect your puppy a lot so be consistent and have plenty of chew toys on hand.  

If your puppy bites you, make a short sharp yelping sound just like a puppy in pain would.  Your puppy is most likely to be startled and stop biting you.  At the same time withdraw your attention from your puppy and ignore it.  This shows your puppy that when they bite, the fun and play stops.  When your puppy is calm, gently praise and reward them. 

Positive reinforcement

Remember not to punish your puppy, as this affects the bond you are trying to develop with them.  It also gives your puppy attention when they are displaying undesirable behaviour which can back-fire on you and actually encourage the behaviour that you don't want to see.  When your puppy engages in well-mannered play, offer food rewards and verbal praise to reinforce the behaviour.  

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Common puppy feeding queries

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This is an image of a litter of puppies.

Feeding your puppy

It can be argued that nothing plays a more important role in healthy puppy growth and development as nutrition, so let's look at some common puppy feeding queries. 

 

Feeding your puppy

It can be argued that nothing plays a more important role in healthy puppy growth and development as nutrition, so let's look at some common puppy feeding queries.  

How much to feed my puppy?

Use the feeding guide found on pet food packaging as a starting point.  This will show you the total daily amount to offer your puppy.  Keep an eye on your puppy's body condition so that you can fine tune the amount fed, if needed.  Have a chat to your veterinarian if you're concerned about your puppy's body condition or growth rate.  

How often to feed my puppy?

In general, younger puppies should be fed smaller meals more frequently.  This is to help allow them take in enough food for growth.  Their stomach capacity is small, therefore they require frequent meals.  

Start off dividing your puppy's total daily food into four small meals.  Over time, the number of meals can be gradually reduced so that by the time your puppy reaches adulthood, they will be on one or two meals per day.  Ensure that your puppy has free access to a continual supply of fresh drinking water in a suitable sized container.

Should I feed my puppy a home-made diet?

It can be tempting to feed a pet a diet made up of human food and table scraps.  However, it's a challenge to create a home-made diet that is complete and balanced, especially in the long term.  Puppies need a complete and balanced diet that is specially formulated to support their healthy growth and development.  A high quality super premium pet food such as ADVANCE™ provides this peace of mind.

In addition, some human foods can be toxic to pets such as grapes, raisins, onions and chocolate. 

Should I feed my puppy dry or wet food?

Dry and wet foods are equally nutritious.  The feeding of both dry and wet foods is known as ‘mixed feeding’.  This method of feeding provides a pet with taste and texture variety and enables them to get the benefits that each feeding format offers.

Different size puppies have different nutritional needs, so remember to choose a formula that is tailored accordingly.  ADVANCE™ has a range of puppy diets to suit the various breed sizes, so you can be sure there's a diet that’s just right for your puppy.

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Toilet training? Help is at hand!

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Toilet training

Toilet training your puppy is a process that will require time and patience.  Like all training, this should be based on a positive reward based training method.  Remember that every puppy is unique, so they all learn at their own pace.  Supervision and regular trips to the toilet area are key when it comes to successful toilet training.  Ideally, you want to avoid mistakes from happening in the first place.  Here we discuss our tips for toilet training success.

Toilet training 

Toilet training your puppy is a process that will require time and patience.  Like all training, this should be based on a positive reward based training method.  Remember that every puppy is unique, so they all learn at their own pace.

Your puppy has a small bladder and bowel so they will need to be taken outdoors to toilet regularly, otherwise accidents will happen!  Supervision and regular trips to the toilet area are key when it comes to successful toilet training.  Ideally, you want to avoid mistakes from happening in the first place.  Here we discuss our tips for toilet training success.

Regular toilet trips

To set your puppy up for success, take them out every hour during the day as well as anytime you see signs they may need to go.  These include sniffing, walking away or in circles, scratching at the floor, waiting by the door or being restless.  When your puppy relieves themselves in their toilet spot be sure to praise and reward them.  Young puppies will need to be taken outdoors to toilet at least every 2 to 3 hours during the night so set your alarm for the next few weeks!

If accidents happen

If you catch your puppy in the process of toileting inside, calmly pick them up and carry them outside.  

Never ever punish your puppy for toileting inside as this will only confuse your puppy and delay the process of toilet training.  These puppies tend to toilet out of sight of their owner for fear of being punished, for example, under the sofa, behind the TV, in another room etc.

Even in the rain

Teach your puppy that it's possible to go to the toilet outside when it's raining or the grass is wet! This means that initially you will have to take your puppy outside in the rain and wait until they go to the toilet.  Praise and reward for a job well done!

When you're out

If you need to leave your puppy alone while you're at work, confine them to an area such as the laundry or kitchen.  You can also create a suitable space using a puppy play pen.  Provide some comfortable bedding or use their crate leaving the door open, fresh water and a range of chew toys. 

Create a toileting area away from the puppy’s bed, as puppies naturally want to toilet away from their sleeping area.  Use whatever surface your puppy will be toileting on long-term.  For puppies that are likely to toilet on grass, use a litter tray containing turf.  For puppies that will live in a more urban environment, you could use a litter tray containing concrete tiles.  Materials such as newspaper or commercial pee pads can be used in a pinch, but they have the disadvantage of not helping the puppy develop a preference for the surface they will eventually be toileting on.  If you can use that type of surface now, you can help your puppy make the connection.

Consistency is key

Ensure that every member of the household is consistent when toilet training.  This will help your puppy learn faster.  Remember to be patient, and if you can maintain a good sense of humour during this period, that's an advantage!

Follow these tips and your puppy will be well on their way to being toilet trained.

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Crate training your puppy

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This is an image of a puppy sitting.

Have you considered a crate for your puppy?  

By nature, dogs like cosy, enclosed spaces to rest in, especially if they're feeling unsure about things.  A crate provides this safe refuge for a puppy, who can seek it for some time out.  A crate is also a great way of teaching your puppy the boundaries of the house while keeping them safe and secure.  Crates can be made of various materials such as plastic or collapsible fabric or wire.  A crate should be big enough so that your dog can stand up, turn around and lie down.     

Have you considered a crate for your puppy?  

By nature, dogs like cosy, enclosed spaces to rest in, especially if they're feeling unsure about things.  A crate provides this safe refuge for a puppy, who can seek it for some time out.

A crate is also a great way of teaching your puppy the boundaries of the house while keeping them safe and secure.  Crates can be made of various materials such as plastic or collapsible fabric or wire.  A crate should be big enough so that your dog can stand up, turn around and lie down.                                                                                                                                                               

How do I 'crate train' my puppy?

Initially, your puppy may need to be ‘crate trained’ and this should always be done in a positive way and at a pace that suits the puppy.  Ensure that the crate looks inviting and let your puppy go over and investigate it.  

 

You can place food rewards around the entrance of the crate, as well as place a few inside.  Offer your puppy verbal praise to encourage them to view the crate as a great place to spend time.  Your puppy will soon be keen to explore.

 

Once they enter the crate, don’t close the crate door just yet, let your puppy enter and leave the crate as they would like.

With practice, your puppy will become more comfortable spending time in their crate and you can close the door.  If your puppy whines, ignore this behaviour and let them out as soon as they are quiet.  Slowly build up the amount of time your puppy uses their crate. 

Using the crate at night

When your puppy is happy spending some time in their crate, you can start to use it at night.  Provide your puppy with chew toys to help them self-settle in their crate.  Remember that young puppies will need regular toilet breaks every 2 to 3 hours, so set your alarm clock.  Trips to the toileting area should be done in a quiet and calm manner, so as not to signal to the puppy this is play time.  Once puppy has relieved themselves place them back in their crate to settle. 

With some practice and patience, your puppy will come to view their crate as a wonderful place.  They now have a safe place to go when they need a rest or some time out.  A crate can come in handy for other reasons too such as if your pet needs to be confined, for example, after surgery.  A crate also makes a great portable home, which can help a pet feel settled if you go on holiday together.

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