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Blog posts tagged with ‘toilet training’

We found 2 results tagged with 'toilet training'.

Urine marking in cats

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This is an image of a cat relaxing.

Communication

In the wild, cats are mostly solitary, they rarely meet with other cats.  However, they still need ways to communicate effectively with each other.  Urine marking, or spraying, is one clever they can exchange information.

Communication

In the wild, cats are mostly solitary, they rarely meet with other cats.  However, they still need ways to communicate effectively with each other, such as to establish territory or indicate a willingness to mate.  Cats also try to avoid conflict. 

One communication method they use is via a system of scent-based ‘signposts’ using urine marking or spraying.  

Your kitten or cat may display urine marking behaviour too, and what's more, these signposts are continually refreshed to keep them up to date.

Spraying or a litter tray problem?

It’s important to work out if your cat is urine marking or having an issue with using their litter tray.  Remember that cats who urine mark will also urinate in their litter trays.  However, there are some clues to look for to help you work out what’s going on.

Vertical surfaces

Urine marking usually occurs on vertical surfaces.  A cat about to spray tends to back up to a vertical object such as a wall and displays an erect body posture with tail pointing straight up in the air.  Urine is then sprayed onto the vertical surface.  It’s not uncommon to see the cat’s tail and even their whole body twitch while they’re spraying.

Volume

The amount of urine that a cat releases for marking purposes is usually less than the amount they void when urinating in their litter tray.

Smell

As marking is a form of communication for cats, sprayed urine is particularly strong smelling.  This is because it contains chemicals including pheromones that help to convey additional information.

What should I do if my cat is spraying?

In some cases, urine marking can be a sign that your kitten or cat is feeling insecure, perhaps believing their territory is under threat.  If you’re having to deal with unwanted wee, don’t worry – there are lots of things you can do to help prevent it:

• Have your cat desexed to reduce their desire to urine mark.  Desexed cats of either gender can still spray, but entire male cats tend to do it the most

• Avoid using ammonia and chlorine cleaners as these smell similar to cat urine and may actually encourage marking behaviour

• Try not to clean up the wee while your cat is around as disrupting the scent might make them more stressed

• Clean the affected area with a 10% solution of biological washing powder, and spray it with an alcohol such as surgical spirit

• Soon after you’ve cleaned the area, encourage your cat to play there as this will help them feel more secure

If the problem continues, talk to your veterinarian for further advice.

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Toilet training? Help is at hand!

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Toilet training

Toilet training your puppy is a process that will require time and patience.  Like all training, this should be based on a positive reward based training method.  Remember that every puppy is unique, so they all learn at their own pace.  Supervision and regular trips to the toilet area are key when it comes to successful toilet training.  Ideally, you want to avoid mistakes from happening in the first place.  Here we discuss our tips for toilet training success.

Toilet training 

Toilet training your puppy is a process that will require time and patience.  Like all training, this should be based on a positive reward based training method.  Remember that every puppy is unique, so they all learn at their own pace.

Your puppy has a small bladder and bowel so they will need to be taken outdoors to toilet regularly, otherwise accidents will happen!  Supervision and regular trips to the toilet area are key when it comes to successful toilet training.  Ideally, you want to avoid mistakes from happening in the first place.  Here we discuss our tips for toilet training success.

Regular toilet trips

To set your puppy up for success, take them out every hour during the day as well as anytime you see signs they may need to go.  These include sniffing, walking away or in circles, scratching at the floor, waiting by the door or being restless.  When your puppy relieves themselves in their toilet spot be sure to praise and reward them.  Young puppies will need to be taken outdoors to toilet at least every 2 to 3 hours during the night so set your alarm for the next few weeks!

If accidents happen

If you catch your puppy in the process of toileting inside, calmly pick them up and carry them outside.  

Never ever punish your puppy for toileting inside as this will only confuse your puppy and delay the process of toilet training.  These puppies tend to toilet out of sight of their owner for fear of being punished, for example, under the sofa, behind the TV, in another room etc.

Even in the rain

Teach your puppy that it's possible to go to the toilet outside when it's raining or the grass is wet! This means that initially you will have to take your puppy outside in the rain and wait until they go to the toilet.  Praise and reward for a job well done!

When you're out

If you need to leave your puppy alone while you're at work, confine them to an area such as the laundry or kitchen.  You can also create a suitable space using a puppy play pen.  Provide some comfortable bedding or use their crate leaving the door open, fresh water and a range of chew toys. 

Create a toileting area away from the puppy’s bed, as puppies naturally want to toilet away from their sleeping area.  Use whatever surface your puppy will be toileting on long-term.  For puppies that are likely to toilet on grass, use a litter tray containing turf.  For puppies that will live in a more urban environment, you could use a litter tray containing concrete tiles.  Materials such as newspaper or commercial pee pads can be used in a pinch, but they have the disadvantage of not helping the puppy develop a preference for the surface they will eventually be toileting on.  If you can use that type of surface now, you can help your puppy make the connection.

Consistency is key

Ensure that every member of the household is consistent when toilet training.  This will help your puppy learn faster.  Remember to be patient, and if you can maintain a good sense of humour during this period, that's an advantage!

Follow these tips and your puppy will be well on their way to being toilet trained.

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