Handling Side Effects From Your Dog’s Non-Core Vaccinations

Dog non core vaccine

Photo by by Samson Katt

 

Handling Side Effects From Your Dog’s Non-Core Vaccinations

Vaccinations are vital for keeping your dog healthy and protecting them against infection. Here in Australia, vaccinations are split into two categories: core and non-core. Core vaccines are considered the minimum amount of protection needed to keep your dog safe, and are administered as part of the routine vaccination schedule recommended for puppies.

Many dog owners also opt for their pet to receive the non-core vaccines as optional extras. These cover less common diseases, and may be recommended based on your dog’s risk level, which is influenced by their health, location and other factors. Some dogs may experience side effects after getting their non-core vaccines, so it is important to know what to do if this happens.

 

Why do side effects occur?

If your dog’s mild side effects haven’t cleared up within two days, make an appointment with your vet. Or, in the event your dog displays any serious side effects, you should contact your vet immediately as this is a serious emergency.

{Vaccinating your dog} is vital to protect them and, with some careful planning, you’ll be ready to spot any side effects that may occur. You can find more information about vaccinations and caring for your dog on our {petcare blog.}

Side effects can occur because vaccinations stimulate your dog’s immune system to fight infection. Usually these side effects are mild and only last around 24-48 hours after your dog has been injected.

 

Possible side effects to keep an eye out for

It’s important to keep a close eye on your dog for a couple of days after they have received their vaccinations, in case they experience any side effects that require vet attention. Typical mild vaccine side effects include:

• tenderness at the site of the injection

• slight fever

• loss of appetite

• fatigue

These symptoms will usually resolve by themselves within a day or two, if your dog is able to rest. Though rare, dogs can also experience more serious side effects from their vaccinations. These can include:

• severe coughing

• vomiting

• diarrhoea

• hives

• swelling, especially on their face

• difficulty breathing

• collapsing

If your dog displays any of these signs after their vaccinations, contact your emergency vet.

 

Side effects from the Parainfluenza Virus vaccinations

Canine Parainfluenza Virus (CPIV) is highly contagious and causes respiratory disease. There are several vaccinations against it, and these can cause mild side effects in a small number of dogs.

These side effects include:

• mild coughing

• sneezing

• nasal discharge

Most symptoms should clear up within two days, so reach out to your vet if your dog is still experiencing side-effects after 48 hours.

 

Side effects from the Bordetella Bronchiseptica vaccination

Bordetella, also known as canine cough, is a respiratory infection. It’s recommended your dog receives the Bordetella vaccine if they regularly socialise with other dogs, as this can increase the likelihood of catching canine cough. It’s common for dogs to experience mild side effects after the vaccine, including:

• lethargy and fatigue

• small bumps near the injection site

• tenderness and stiffness near the injection site

• cold-like symptoms, including sneezing, especially if your dog received their vaccine

as a nasal spray

Most symptoms should clear up within two days, but if your dog is still experiencing side effects after 48 hours, be sure to contact your vet.

 

Side effects from the Canine Adenovirus vaccination

Canine Adenovirus, also known as infectious hepatitis, affects dogs’ liver, blood vessels, immune system, kidneys, heart, lung, and eyes. If your dog has just received their vaccination for Canine Advenovirus, you should look out for minor, short-lived vaccine side effects, such as:

• swelling or tenderness near the injection site

• slight fever

• loss of appetite

• short-term lethargy

These side effects should clear up within two days, so make sure you contact your vet if your dog is still experiencing symptoms after that time.

More serious side effects from the vaccination can include:

• swelling, especially in the neck, muzzle, face and eyes

• severe coughing

• itchy skin

• raised bumps all over the skin

• persistent vomiting and diarrhoea

These side effects are rare but can be fatal, so, if you notice any of these symptoms, it’s important to get your dog to a vet immediately.

 

What to do if you spot any side effects

Serious side effects of vaccinations are rare, but if they do occur, it is most likely, your dog will experience them almost immediately after their vaccinations. It can be a good idea to keep them at the vet’s for around twenty minutes after their vaccinations, in case serious side effects occur. When you do take them home, make sure to keep an eye on them as most reactions will occur within the first 24 hours post-vaccination. Mild side effects should clear up within a few days, however, it’s important to make a note of any side effects you see. Your vet needs to know about any reactions your dog has, as adverse side effects can often become more severe with subsequent vaccinations.

 

When to see your vet

If your dog’s mild side effects haven’t cleared up within two days, make an appointment with your vet. Or, in the event your dog displays any serious side effects, you should contact your vet immediately as this is a serious emergency.

Vaccinating your dog is vital to protect them and, with some careful planning, you’ll be ready to spot any side effects that may occur. You can find more information about vaccinations and caring for your dog on our petcare blog

 

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