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ADVANCE™ is scientifically formulated to help improve pet health.  Read all the latest articles and news, as well as get tips and advice on puppy, kitten, dog and cat nutrition and health care topics.  Brought to you by the experts at ADVANCE™ premium pet food.

Importance of quality nutrition for puppies

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This is an image of a Beagle sitting.

Big changes

Puppyhood is an amazing time of change and development, both physically and mentally.  Fuelling the incredible changes that you see in your puppy is the nutrition you provide.  It can be argued that no other factor plays such a crucial role in the overall health and wellbeing of pets as a nutritionally balanced diet.  So choosing the right diet is vitally important. 

Big changes

Puppyhood is an amazing time of change and development, both physically and mentally.

Fuelling the incredible changes that you see in your puppy is the nutrition you provide.  It can be argued that no other factor plays such a crucial role in the overall health and wellbeing of pets as a nutritionally balanced diet.  So choosing the right diet is vitally important. 

How long should I feed puppy food for?

Different sized dogs grow at different rates and become adults at different times. 

How can ADVANCE™ support my puppy's health? 

ADVANCE™ has been formulated to support multiple pet health indicators.  This is achieved through high quality ingredients, potent actives as well as synergetic complexes of nutrients.

All dry food products in the ADVANCE™ Puppy range contain:

• NUTRIFIBRE which results in fewer, firmer stools.

• Antioxidants which help prevent cellular damage and provide a natural defence for your pet against Australia’s harsh climatic conditions.

• Enhanced levels of zinc and omega 3 and 6 fatty acids for a healthy skin and shiny coat.

• Smart start – fish oil (natural source of DHA) and enhanced levels of Choline to help support brain development.

Every ingredient in ADVANCE™ serves a precise purpose to deliver the superior nutrition your puppy needs. 

Different size puppies have different nutritional needs, so remember to choose a formula that is tailored accordingly.  ADVANCE™ has a range of puppy diets to suit the various breed sizes, so you can be sure there's a diet that is just right for your puppy.

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Puppy spending time alone

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Home alone

All puppies have to get used to spending some time by themselves.  Help your puppy learn that their time alone can be a positive thing, through training and a little planning. 

Home alone

All puppies have to get used to spending some time by themselves.  Help your puppy learn that their time alone can be a positive thing, through training and a little planning. 

Start small

You should begin by leaving your puppy alone in a room for a couple of minutes and gradually increase the amount of time.  The time alone should be a positive thing, so providing suitable play toys in your absence will help to keep them occupied.  Having your puppy crate trained means that you have a safe refuge for these short periods of confinement, as well as a place where your puppy feels relaxed.            

              

Leaving the house

Start leaving the house for short periods and gradually increase the amount of time your puppy is left. The length of time alone should be varied so your puppy learns that you leaving doesn’t always mean you will be gone for a long time.  

When leaving them alone it's important not to make lots of fuss saying goodbye; it's better to simply leave as if nothing is happening.  On returning, it can help to ignore your puppy for a few minutes so they are not rewarded for any over-excitable behaviour.

If your puppy has had an accident and messed in the house you should simply clean it up as if nothing has happened, and never punish them for it.  It may also help to leave a radio on whilst out, so your puppy has some background distractions and the home is not so quiet.  This will also drown out any noises coming from outside that your puppy may react to.

Boredom busters

Toys that provide mental stimulation such as chew toys and those that dispense kibble as a reward for puzzle solving, help keep boredom at bay.  Remember to rotate toys on a daily basis so that they maintain their novelty factor. 

Consider other ways for your pup to stay entertained, such as creating a digging area using a child’s sand pit.  This can also teach a puppy where the ‘approved’ digging location is and help save your garden.

 

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Grooming your puppy

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Make grooming time fun!

As part of general handling, you’ll need to get your puppy accustomed to being groomed and washed.  This is also a great time to inspect the condition of their skin and coat.  When brushing and bathing, be gentle and and initially keep the sessions short.  Be sure to offer lots of positive reinforcement with treats and praise, so that grooming time is fun and a chance for you both to bond.  Check out our tips for brushing, bathing and nail trimming.

Make grooming time fun

As part of general handling, you’ll need to get your puppy accustomed to being groomed and washed.  This is also a great time to inspect the condition of their skin and coat. 

When brushing and bathing, be gentle, move slowly and initially keep the sessions short.  Progress only at a pace your puppy is comfortable with.  Be sure to offer lots of positive reinforcement with treats and praise, so that grooming time is fun and a chance for you both to bond.

Brushing your puppy

Different dog breeds have different grooming requirements, so be sure to look into what grooming tools you might need for your puppy.

To help keep your puppy looking their best, here’s our guide for how often to brush:

Short-haired breeds:     brush 1 to 2 times per week

Medium-length coats:    brush every second day

Long-haired breeds:      brush gently every day

While your puppy is getting used to being brushed, offer lots of positive reinforcement with treats and praise, to keep grooming time enjoyable.

Bathing your puppy

As a rule of thumb, try to limit baths to no more frequently than once a month as bathing removes natural oils from your puppy’s coat.  Use lukewarm water and a specially formulated puppy shampoo.  Once bathed, wipe your puppy down with a towel and keep them warm until they are properly dry.

To help your puppy stay looking great in between baths, keep up regular brushing and combing in conjunction with wiping with a towel or pet wipes.  Regularly check your puppy’s ears, and if you see any discharge or abnormalities be sure to check in with your veterinarian.

How do I trim my puppy's nails?

Proper care of claws (nails) is important, and sometimes puppies need their claws trimmed.  Use a pet claw trimmer and have someone gently restrain your puppy, or better still, ask your puppy to offer their paws.  Trim each claw back a little at a time until you get close to the quick, the pink part where the blood supply is.  You can see where this is on white claws, but you will need to use your judgement on dark coloured claws. 

If your puppy has any dew claws, keep your eye on them as they will need a regular clip.  Be sure to pair this exercise with food treats to ensure a positive association with claw trimming. 

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Gum disease in dogs

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

The stats

80% of dogs aged over 3 years have some form of gum disease, yet less than 10% of pet parents realise their pet has a dental health issue.  By establishing a good oral health routine from a young age, your dog can avoid becoming part of this statistic. 

The stats

80% of dogs aged over 3 years have some form of gum disease, yet less than 10% of pet parents realise their pet has a dental health issue.  By establishing a good oral health routine from a young age, your dog can avoid becoming part of this statistic. 

Teething

Puppies start losing their temporary teeth (also known as milk teeth) between 4 and 6 months of age.  These are replaced by a set of adult teeth. The milk teeth usually fall out easily and are often swallowed by the puppy.  Teething can increase chewing and mouthing behaviours, so provide plenty of quality, safe chew toys.  By the time a puppy is 7 or 8 months old, they should have all of their permanent teeth.

Gum disease

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is common in dogs, so start dental care while your puppy is young.  

Plaque can form on the teeth which contains bacteria and leads to gingivitis (inflammation of the gums).  Plaque can then mineralize to form tartar which leads to bad breath and gum recession.  If left untreated, this painful condition can eventually lead to tooth loss and even systemic disease such as organ failure. 

Tooth brushing

Prevention is better than cure, and the most effective way to prevent tartar deposits is to brush your dog’s teeth daily.  

Step 1: Start with pet toothpaste

Using washed hands, apply a small strip of specially designed pet toothpaste to your finger and allow your dog to lick it off.  Repeat a few times.  Pet toothpaste comes in a variety of different pet enticing flavours.  Never use human toothpaste as it’s toxic to pets.

Step 2: Now get your dog accustomed to having their mouth and teeth touched

Apply pet toothpaste to your clean finger, lift your dog’s lip and smear the pet toothpaste on the teeth and gums.  Start slowly progressing only as far into the mouth as your dog is comfortable. Be gentle and patient and use lots of positive reinforcement (treats, verbal praise).  

Step 3: Progress to using a finger-brush and then a doggie toothbrush – start with the canine teeth

Prepare the brush with pet toothpaste and gently brush the canine teeth first.  Use an up and down motion, with the toothbrush moving away from the gum to the tip of the tooth.  The front teeth are the most sensitive area of your dog’s mouth, so avoid brushing them just yet.

Step 4: Toothbrush the back teeth

After brushing the canine teeth in an up and down motion, now move to brushing the back teeth using a circular motion.  Progress only at a pace your dog is comfortable, and keep up the positive reward based training.

Step 5: Toothbrush all the teeth

Once your dog is comfortable with Step 4, hold their mouth closed around the muzzle and gently lift their upper lip to reveal the incisor teeth.  Brush these gently in an up and down motion.  Some dogs may sneeze when their incisors are brushed.

Gradually increase the amount of time you spend brushing your dog’s teeth.  Ideally, toothbrushing should be done every day.

Additional help

Specially designed dental dry food such as ADVANCE™ Dental varieties can be offered when your puppy becomes an adult.  Dental treats such as GREENIES™ can be used daily, and fed from 6 months of age.  These products are designed to help reduce plaque and tartar accumulation.  They can be especially helpful for pets who won't allow their teeth to be brushed.  

Follow these tips, to keep your dog’s pearly whites in top shape!

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How to stop your puppy 'jumping up'

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Puppy 03 puppy feeding time from Advancepet on Vimeo.

Jumping up

While we all love coming home to an affectionate puppy or dog, it’s important to avoid inadvertently encouraging ‘jumping up’ behaviour.  Your cute (and small-ish) puppy will grow, and you might not want to see this behaviour when they reach adulthood.

Jumping up

While we all love coming home to an affectionate puppy or dog, it’s important to avoid inadvertently encouraging ‘jumping up’ behaviour.  Your cute (and small-ish) puppy will grow, and you might not want to see this behaviour when they reach adulthood.

Be consistent 

Now is the time to be consistent in the way you respond to your puppy’s behaviour.  If you praise and give attention to your puppy when they jump up, they’re being reinforced to offering you this behaviour.  They will not understand why you are reacting differently when they become a bigger dog.

How do I train my puppy not to 'jump up'?

Reward your puppy for an alternative behaviour such as sitting or having all four paws on the floor.  If your puppy jumps on you, immediately turn away.  Do not look at or speak to your dog.  When they get down and have all paws on the ground, immediately praise and reward. 

Consistently practice this over and over so that your puppy learns the connection between having all paws on the ground and a reward.  Ensure this is consistently applied by all family, friends and visitors. Set your puppy up for success!  Anticipate jumping up and instead ask for the alternative behaviour.  Your puppy will learn that they don’t need to jump up.  Instead, if they are calm and sit, they will get your attention.

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Digestive upset in puppies

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Bellyache

Did you know that digestive upset is common in puppies?  Mouthy behaviour and an immune system that is still developing all put a puppy at increased risk of an upset tummy.  In addition, rapid dietary change and the stress associated with moving to a new home, plus other causes such as infectious agents, can lead to loose faeces, diarrhoea or vomiting. 

Bellyache

Did you know that digestive upset is common in puppies?  Mouthy behaviour and an immune system that is still developing all put a puppy at increased risk of an upset tummy.  In addition, rapid dietary change and the stress associated with moving to a new home, plus other causes such as infectious agents, can lead to loose faeces, diarrhoea or vomiting. 

Avoid milk

Once puppies are weaned from their mother, they no longer require milk as part of their diet.  The feeding of cow’s milk to puppies can lead to digestive upset, and should be avoided.  Lactose-free pet milk is an option, but a complete and balanced puppy diet will supply all the essential nutrition your puppy needs. 

How can I avoid my puppy getting an upset tummy?

  • Ensure that your puppy's vaccinations and worming treatments are up to date
  • Don't let your puppy drink from puddles when out on walks  
  • Avoid access to food scraps and garbage
  • Offer small, frequent meals
  • Make any diet changes gradual, over a period of 7 days.  Add a small proportion of the new diet to the puppy’s regular diet on the first day.  The proportion of the new diet should be gradually increased each day, so that it makes up half of the puppy’s food on day 4 and the whole meal by day 7.

When to call the Vet

If your puppy is experiencing diarrhoea, vomiting or lethargy be sure to take them for a check-up at the Vet.  Dehydration can occur quickly in youngsters.  Signs of dehydration include dry skin that lacks elasticity such as neck skin that stays tented when gently pinched, lethargy, increased heart rate, high fever and a dry mouth.

By feeding a high quality, highly digestible puppy food you will reduce the chance of an upset tummy in your puppy.                                                                                 

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Basic puppy training

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Sit, stay and come

Puppies sure are on a steep learning curve, especially in their first few months.  How’s your puppy going with the three key commands of sit, stay and come?      

                                                                                                                           

Sit, stay and come

Puppies sure are on a steep learning curve, especially in their first few months. 

How’s your puppy going with the three key commands of sit, stay and come?

Positive reinforcement

Puppy training should be based on a positive reward based training method.  This gentle method of training is effective with all breeds of dog. Punishing your puppy with harsh reprimands if they misbehave is not necessary.  

The key to your puppy learning desirable behaviour is to ignore the alternative undesirable behaviour.  By rewarding desirable ‘good dog’ conduct, your puppy will offer these behaviours more often.  Likewise not rewarding poor behaviour will encourage it to cease.

Rewards

For early puppy training, food treats are generally the most motivating and convenient reward.  However, as the desired behaviour is learned, the use of food treats should be phased out and replaced with other forms of reward.  This can include offering praise, patting or playing with a toy, as well as 'life-rewards' which are things your puppy enjoys in their daily life such as games, trips to places they like, extra walks etc

Remember that food treats should not make up more than 10% of your puppy’s daily food intake and chocolate should not be used as a treat for your dog.  If you need to do a lot of food reward training, which is common in the early days with your puppy, consider using a portion of your puppy’s main meal dry kibble for training.  That way they are receiving complete and balanced nutrition, and you can reduce their main meal volume accordingly to avoid over-feeding. 

‘Sit’ Command

Hold a food treat in your hand and place your hand in front of your puppy’s nose.  Gradually move your hand upwards.  Your puppy will follow the food treat causing their head to move upwards and their backside to move towards the floor.  Just before your puppy’s rear touches the floor, say ‘sit’.  At the moment their rear touches the floor, praise and reward.  Repeat over several training sessions.

The next step is to fade out the food lure.  Say ‘sit’ and use the same hand signal as in step one but do not have food in your hand.  When your puppy sits, then you can praise and reward them with a treat.

‘Stay’ Command

Begin with your puppy sitting in front of you.  Say ‘stay’ and wait 2 to 3 seconds.  If your puppy does not move, praise and reward them.  If your puppy moves, simply turn away and do not offer a reward.  Now ask your puppy to ‘stay’ and take one small step sideways.  If your puppy remains still, offer praise and reward them.  Gradually increase the distance you move away from your puppy.

‘Come’ Command

Show your puppy that you have their favourite treat or toy.  Call your puppy’s name followed by the word ‘come’ in an enthusiastic tone.  Step backwards.  As your puppy comes towards you, praise and reward them.  If there are others in the household, practice calling the puppy between you.  Never ever call your puppy to you and punish them.  This will make them less likely to come to you the next time you call.

Everyone learns best when they're having fun, so keep your practice sessions short and enjoyable.

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Should I feed wet or dry food?

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Wet and dry food

There's an ever increasing range of pet food products available, often in a variety of formats.  Many pet parents wonder if they should be feeding dry food, wet food or a combination.  Each feeding format has specific advantages so let’s take a look at some of them.

Wet and dry food

There's an ever increasing range of pet food products available, often in a variety of formats.  Many pet parents wonder if they should be feeding dry food, wet food or a combination. 

Each feeding format offers specific advantages so let’s take a look at some of them.

Wet food

• Comes in a variety of packaging types such as tray, pouch and can

• Provides variety to a pet’s diet through flavour and texture

• Food is sterilised through cooking, so no preservatives are added

• Easy to chew texture can help puppies and kittens, as well as senior pets

• Provides additional moisture, especially beneficial to the pet when the weather is warm

• Aromas and texture can help tempt fussy eaters

• High moisture content helps maintain lower urinary tract health

• Less calorie dense than dry food, so can assist with weight loss and healthy weight management

Dry food:

• Concentrated nutrition, so you feed less

• Economical

• Convenient to use and store

• Crunchy kibbles may help improve dental health and freshen breath

• May contain active ingredients such as stabilised Green Lipped Mussel powder for joint health

Should I feed wet or dry food?

Wet and dry foods are equally nutritious.  The important thing is that you offer your pet a diet that is complete and balanced for their life-stage.

The feeding of both wet and dry food formats together is known as ‘mixed feeding’.  This method of feeding provides a pet with taste and texture variety and enables them to get the benefits that each feeding format offers.  In other words, mixed feeding provides a pet with the best of both worlds, so it's a great choice. 

When feeding both ADVANCE™ wet and dry food, simply halve the recommended quantities of each product and let your pet enjoy the advantages of both formats.

What about home prepared and raw feeding?

Some pet parents want to feed the wild nature of their cats and dogs, but it’s important to remember that our couch-dwelling pets have evolved quite a bit from their days as wolves and free-roaming cats. 

Cats and dogs require about 40 essential nutrients, each in the right form and in the right amount (balanced) to deliver complete nutrition.  Formulating a pet’s diet means ensuring that the minimum and maximum amounts of vitamins and minerals are met – and that adds an extra element of risk to home-prepared or raw meals.

While raw meat can be a novelty for your pet, it has to be very fresh.  A recent study, published in Vet Record, has found that raw meat can contain high levels of bacteria that may pose health risks for your pet.  The researchers also explain that such food could present a health risk to you, or others in your household if their immune system is compromised (children, the elderly or anyone using immune system suppressant medication for a health condition).

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Puppies and chewing behaviour

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This is an image of a puppy with a stick in their mouth

Nom nom nom

Given that puppies learn through mouthing behaviours, it's normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects.  Many pet parents find that chewing behaviours start to increase in intensity when their puppy is around 4 to 6 months of age due to teething.  Chewing helps a dog achieve a number of things, so let's take a look at how you can help manage chewing behaviours in your puppy.

Nom nom nom

Given that puppies learn through mouthing behaviours, it's normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects.  Many pet parents find that chewing behaviours start to increase in intensity when their puppy is around 4 to 6 months of age due to teething.  

Chewing helps a dog achieve a number of things.  For puppies, it’s a way to help relieve teething pain when the gums are sore and new teeth are erupting.  For older dogs, chewing helps exercise the jaws to keep them strong, as well as promoting dental health by helping keep teeth clean. 

Chewing also plays an important role in alleviating boredom and can help a puppy self-soothe which relieves mild anxiety or frustration. 

Tensions can arise over what is being chewed - a chew toy is fine, your new shoes are not!

How can I stop my puppy from chewing everything?

Given the benefits that chewing provides to puppies, we don't want to inhibit the behaviour but we do need to teach a puppy what is okay to chew and what is not. 

By offering a range of chew toys, and rotating them regularly to maintain their novelty factor and prevent boredom, you can show your puppy what is acceptable to chew.  Provide a range of different toys with varying shapes, textures and flavours. 

As part of puppy proofing your home, be sure to remove any items you value out of your puppy’s reach to prevent them being chewed.  This also helps ensure your puppy's safety (think chewed electrical wires). 

Ensure that the chew toys you offer your puppy are safe.  Inspect them regularly for signs of wear and replace any damaged toys.

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Walking on the leash

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Did someone say 'walkies'?

Getting out and about on walking adventures is one of the best parts of life with a dog, but all puppies need time to get used to walking on the leash.  Follow our tips and you'll be strutting your stuff in no time!

Did someone say 'walkies'?

Getting out and about on walking adventures is one of the best parts of life with a dog, but all puppies need time to get used to walking on the leash. 

Follow our tips and you'll be strutting your stuff in no time!

How do I get my puppy used to walking on a leash?

Practice attaching a light leash to your puppy’s collar and encourage them to walk around the room.  Initially, allow your puppy to drag the leash along the floor.  Next, pick up the end of the leash and encourage your puppy to come toward you.

As your puppy moves forward, praise and reward them.  If your puppy sits and refuses to move, change direction and call your puppy towards you with an enthusiastic tone of voice.  When your puppy comes, praise and reward them. 

Keep practice sessions short and fun, so that your puppy enjoys them and views the leash in a positive way. 

How do I stop my puppy from pulling on the leash?

Your puppy should learn that pulling on the leash results in stopping, rather than going forward. 

Attach a leash to your puppy's collar and then encourage your puppy to stand near your side.  Attract your puppy’s attention by saying their name and then start walking forward.  When your puppy is walking by your side without pulling, praise and reward them. 

If your puppy pulls on the leash, stop so that your puppy cannot continue forward.  You can then encourage your puppy back to your side and begin moving forward again.  It can help to lure your puppy into position with a treat or a toy. 

Special harnesses and halters are available which can help prevent large or strong puppies from pulling on the leash.  These may be useful but should not be used as a substitute for training a puppy to walk without pulling.

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